What happens when someone dies? I’m sure that at some time or another in your life you’ve probably asked yourself that question or wondered about what happens after death.

Life Force - What Happens When Somebody DiesOne of the most common fears is the fear of death, and my intention for writing this short article is so you would take a look at what your beliefs are about death. Here are some of my thoughts on the subject.

This body of ours holds the life force of who we are which keeps us alive. We know that energy can never be destroyed, it can only be changed or transmuted. This intangible substance that we call “essence” also known as chi, life force, spirit, and by other names, can never be destroyed, because it has no form and it’s invisible.

It’s this life force that inhabits and animates our bodies.

Often when we are alive we rarely give thought to the essence, the chi or the life force within us. When we die the life force or chi that was within us is what leaves our body or the form.

When we look at the body at death all we see is the form without the life force. This is what we call death, which makes sense since the life force which was keeping the body alive has left and is no longer sustaining it.

If we fear death I believe it’s because we fear that there’s nothing left after our physical body is destroyed, that we are dead forever and that’s the end, but is death really the end? This debate on after life has gone on for centuries and will probably continue to do so for a long time.

If you’ve had a challenge about this subject here are some related questions that you could ask yourself to do with death:

  • Who am I?
  • Why are we born?
  • What is the meaning of life?
  • What is the purpose of life?

Answering those questions will give you some insights on the overall picture to do with death and dying. Please share your comments in the comment box below.

Love & Blessings,

Brenda

Here’s an Inspirational Story

HANG ON TO EACH OTHER

Too often we feel alone. But there is always someone ready to take our hand.

This is a beautiful story of an overworked nurse who escorted a tired, young man to her patient’s bedside. Leaning over and speaking loudly to the elderly patient, she said, “Your son is here.” With great effort, his unfocussed eyes opened, then flickered shut again. The young man squeezed the aged hand in his and sat beside the bed. Throughout the night he sat there, holding the old man’s hand and whispering words of comfort.

By morning’s light, the patient had died. In moments, hospital staff swarmed into the room to turn off machines and remove needles. The nurse stepped over to the young man’s side and began to offer sympathy, but he interrupted her. “Who was that man?” he asked.

The startled nurse replied, “I thought he was your father!” “No, he was not my father,” he answered. “I never saw him before in my life.”

“Then, why didn’t you say something when I took you to him?”

“I realized he needed his son and his son wasn’t here,” the man explained. “And since he was too sick to recognize that I was not his son, I knew he needed me.”

Mother Teresa used to remind us that nobody should have to die alone. Likewise, nobody should have to grieve alone or cry alone either. Or laugh alone or celebrate alone.

We are made to travel life’s journey hand in hand. There is someone ready to grasp your hand today. And someone hoping you will take theirs.